Queueing in the Linux Network Stack

Text extracted from the original post: here. There are a lot more infos on the original post.

“Packet queues are a core component of any network stack or device. They allow for asynchronous modules to communicate, increase performance and have the side effect of impacting latency. This article aims to explain where IP packets are queued on the transmit path of the Linux network stack, how interesting new latency-reducing features, such as BQL, operate and how to control buffering for reduced latency.”

 

Queueing Disciplines (QDisc)

“The driver queue is a simple first-in, first-out (FIFO) queue. It treats all packets equally and has no capabilities for distinguishing between packets of different flows. This design keeps the NIC driver software simple and fast. Note that more advanced Ethernet and most wireless NICs support multiple independent transmission queues, but similarly, each of these queues is typically a FIFO. A higher layer is responsible for choosing which transmission queue to use.

Sandwiched between the IP stack and the driver queue is the queueing discipline (QDisc) layer (Figure 1). This layer implements the traffic management capabilities of the Linux kernel, which include traffic classification, prioritization and rate shaping. The QDisc layer is configured through the somewhat opaque tc command. There are three key concepts to understand in the QDisc layer: QDiscs, classes and filters.

The QDisc is the Linux abstraction for traffic queues, which are more complex than the standard FIFO queue. This interface allows the QDisc to carry out complex queue management behaviors without requiring the IP stack or the NIC driver to be modified. By default, every network interface is assigned a pfifo_fast QDisc (http://lartc.org/howto/lartc.qdisc.classless.html), which implements a simple three-band prioritization scheme based on the TOS bits. Despite being the default, the pfifo_fast QDisc is far from the best choice, because it defaults to having very deep queues (see txqueuelen below) and is not flow aware.

The second concept, which is closely related to the QDisc, is the class. Individual QDiscs may implement classes in order to handle subsets of the traffic differently—for example, the Hierarchical Token Bucket (HTB,http://lartc.org/manpages/tc-htb.html). QDisc allows the user to configure multiple classes, each with a different bitrate, and direct traffic to each as desired. Not all QDiscs have support for multiple classes. Those that do are referred to as classful QDiscs, and those that do not are referred to as classless QDiscs.

Filters (also called classifiers) are the mechanism used to direct traffic to a particular QDisc or class. There are many different filters of varying complexity. The u32 filter (http://www.lartc.org/lartc.html#LARTC.ADV-FILTER.U32) is the most generic, and the flow filter is the easiest to use.”

 

 

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